Search

Last Best Hope of Earth

A Blog Covering US History and Politics

Tag

Election of 1840

The Legacy of the Whig Party

clay44b
The New York Tribune, a Whig Newspaper, Endorsing its Candidates.

Following the Election of 1840, members of the Whig Party must have been optimistic about their future. They likely imagined that the dominance of the Jacksonian Democrats could be replicated within the ranks of the Whigs and supplant the Democrats. It was not to be, however.

Continue reading “The Legacy of the Whig Party”

The Darkest Spot on the American Mantle

clay
Henry Clay. By: Henry F. Darby.

In 1832, Henry Clay addressed the Senate, expressing his hope that “some day,” America “would be rid of this, the darkest spot on its mantle,” speaking of slavery. Daniel Walker Howe, What Hath God Wrought: Transformation of America, 1815-1848, 586 quoting Life, Correspondence, and Speeches of Henry Clay, ed. Calvin Colton (New York, 1857), I, 189, 191.

Continue reading “The Darkest Spot on the American Mantle”

Election of 1840: The Rhetoric

albert_gallatin_hoit_-_william_henry_harrison_-_google_art_project
William Henry Harrison. By: Albert Gallatin Hoit.

The Election of 1840 juxtaposed the Whig Party’s policies against the Democratic Party’s more fluid policies. The Whigs “possessed a more coherent program: a national bank, a protective tariff, government subsidies to transportation projects, the public lands treated as a source of revenue, and tax-supported public schools.” Daniel Walker Howe, What Hath God Wrought: Transformation of America, 1815-1848, 583-84. The Democrats did not have such rigid policies, relying instead on the “emotional bond” they they had with their followers, rather than policy initiatives. Id. at 584 citing Matthew Crenson, The Federal Machine: Beginnings of Bureaucracy in Jacksonian America (Baltimore, 1975), 29.

Continue reading “Election of 1840: The Rhetoric”

Election of 1840: Voter Turnout

franceswright
Frances Wright. By: John Chester Buttre.

The Election of 1840 is one that stands out in history. That is for principally one reason: voter turnout.

Continue reading “Election of 1840: Voter Turnout”

Election of 1840: The Campaign

harrisonlogcabincampaign
Depiction of William Henry Harrison with a Log Cabin and Hard Cider.

As was customary until 1904, an incumbent president did not campaign openly for his re-election. This was true for President Martin Van Buren as well. See Daniel Walker Howe, What Hath God Wrought: Transformation of America, 1815-1848, 573.

Continue reading “Election of 1840: The Campaign”

The Inauguration of William Henry Harrison

rembrandt_peale_-_william_henry_harrison_-_google_art_project
William Henry Harrison. By: Rembrandt Peale.

William Henry Harrison, a Whig, won the White House in the election of 1840. In March 1841, for his inauguration, he stood in the cold and wind and spoke for an hour and a half. See Daniel Walker Howe, What Hath God Wrought: Transformation of America, 1815-1848, 570.

Continue reading “The Inauguration of William Henry Harrison”

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑