Search

Last Best Hope of Earth

A Blog Covering US History and Politics

Tag

Election of 1848

The Election of 1852

george_p-a-_healy_-_franklin_pierce_-_google_art_project
President Franklin Pierce. By: George P.A. Healy.

With the first term of Millard Fillmore’s presidency winding down in 1852, the Democrats felt a sense of momentum that they could reclaim the White House. In the midterm elections of 1850, the Democrats secured 140 of the 233 seats in the House of Representatives, eclipsing the Whig Party. See David Potter, The Impending Crisis: America Before the Civil War, 1848-1861, 141.

Continue reading “The Election of 1852”

Advertisements

A Deadlocked and Destructive Congress

oneofive
The United States Capitol in 1848. Unknown Photographer, credit Library of Congress.

During President James Polk’s administration, Congress grappled with resolving sectional tension arising out of whether slavery would be extended to newly acquired land from Mexico as well as the Oregon territory. Congress did not resolve that sectional tension but exacerbated it in what may have been one of the most deadlocked and destructive Congresses in American history. Continue reading “A Deadlocked and Destructive Congress”

The Theories of Slavery

a89cbad2a1dccb130f3199e02ae7de2c
Trout Fishing in Sullivan County, New York. By: Henry Inman.

In the 15 years leading up to the Civil War, a wide variety of theories emerged for how the federal government should deal with slavery expanding, or not expanding, into the territories acquired by the United States.

Continue reading “The Theories of Slavery”

Election of 1848: Whig Victory

white-house-south-face-1840s
The White House in 1848. Credit: Library of Congress.

On November 7, 1848, Americans went to the polls to choose between Martin Van Buren, Zachary Taylor, and Lewis Cass.

Continue reading “Election of 1848: Whig Victory”

Election of 1848: The Barnburners

smoking_him_out
A Political Cartoon Regarding the Barnburners.

Approaching the Election of 1848, President James Polk did not have unanimous support amongst Democrats. In fact, quite the opposite.

Continue reading “Election of 1848: The Barnburners”

Election of 1848: The Candidates

hd_1848electiontopic
The Whig Ticket for President, Zachary Taylor, and Vice President, Millard Fillmore.

The Election of 1848 was bound to be unique, as President James Polk had made clear that he would serve only one term as president. With that, the Whigs and the Democrats had to put forth candidates that could meet the parties’ respective goals of reversing President Polk’s policies (the Whigs) and expanding on President Polk’s policies (the Democrats).

Continue reading “Election of 1848: The Candidates”

The Deadliest War in American History

winfield_scott_-_national_portrait_gallery
Winfield Scott. By: Robert Walter Weir.

President James Polk, at the outbreak of the Mexican-American War, was concerned about the ramifications of a significant, drawn-out conflict. He was aware that a Whig military hero could emerge, just as William Henry Harrison had. See Daniel Walker Howe, What Hath God Wrought: Transformation of America, 1815-1848, 750.

Continue reading “The Deadliest War in American History”

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑