Constitution Sunday: “A Political Dialogue”

“A Political Dialogue” Massachusetts Centinel (Boston), October 24, 1787 Following are excerpts from an article published in the Massachusetts Centinel, which purported to capture a conversation between “Mr. Grumble” and “Mr. Union”: “Mr. Union. Well, but neighbour, what are your objections to the new Constitution?” “Mr. Grumble. Why, as to the matter, I can’t sayContinue reading “Constitution Sunday: “A Political Dialogue””

Constitution Sunday: “An Old Whig” [George Bryan et al.] I

“An Old Whig” [George Bryan et al.] I Independent Gazetteer (Philadelphia), October 12, 1787 Following is a series of excerpts from George Bryan’s article in the Independent Gazetteer: “And after the constitution is once ratified, it must remain fixed until two thirds of both the houses of Congress shall deem it necessary to propose amendments;

Constitution Sunday: Rebuttal to “An Officer of the Late Continental Army”: “Plain Truth”

Rebuttal to “An Officer of the Late Continental Army”: “Plain Truth” Independent Gazetteer (Philadelphia), November 10, 1787 Following are excerpts from an article with an unknown author, published as a rebuttal to a reply by an officer of the late Continental Army to James Wilson’s speech: “Congress may ‘provide for calling forth the militia,’ ‘and mayContinue reading “Constitution Sunday: Rebuttal to “An Officer of the Late Continental Army”: “Plain Truth””

Constitution Sunday: Reply to Wilson’s Speech: “An Officer of the Late Continental Army”

Reply to Wilson’s Speech: “An Officer of the Late Continental Army” Independent Gazetteer (Philadelphia), November 6, 1787 Following are excerpts from an article with an unknown author, published in response to James Wilson’s speech: “That of the senate is so small that it renders its extensive powers extremely dangerous: it is to consist only of 26Continue reading “Constitution Sunday: Reply to Wilson’s Speech: “An Officer of the Late Continental Army””

Constitution Sunday: Reply to Wilson’s Speech: “Cincinnatus” [Arthur Lee] I

Reply to Wilson’s Speech: “Cincinnatus” [Arthur Lee] I New York Journal, November 1, 1787 Following are excerpts from the article, published in response to James Wilson’s speech: “Your first attempt is to apologize for so very obvious a defect as—the omission of a declaration of rights. This apology consists in a very ingenious discovery; thatContinue reading “Constitution Sunday: Reply to Wilson’s Speech: “Cincinnatus” [Arthur Lee] I”

Constitution Sunday: Reply to Wilson’s Speech: “A Democratic Federalist”

Reply to Wilson’s Speech: “A Democratic Federalist” Pennsylvania Herald (Philadelphia), October 17, 1787 Following are excerpts from the article, published in response to James Wilson’s speech:

Division and Balancing of Political Power

Because the Federalists outmaneuvered the Antifederalists in presenting the Constitution to the American people, the Antifederalists faced a predicament of what to do. As Richard Henry Lee stated, many who wished to change the federal structure of government realized that they had to accept “this or nothing.” Gordon Wood, The Creation of the American Republic: 1776-1787,Continue reading “Division and Balancing of Political Power”

War Between the Governors and Governed

The debate surrounding the adoption of the Bill of Rights revealed to many Americans the stark differences between Federalists and Antifederalists. Edmund Pendleton, in the Virginia Convention, stated that opposition to the Constitution “rested on ‘mistaken apprehensions of danger, drawn from observations on government which do not apply to us.’” Gordon Wood, The Creation of theContinue reading “War Between the Governors and Governed”